Clinical Trials

Mission
Clinical trials and research studies are a key component of the multidisciplinary approach of the Johns Hopkins Colon Cancer Health Care Team.  Clinical trials test new treatments in people with cancer, such as: new drugs, new treatment combinations, new approaches to surgery or radiation therapy, or, new methods, such as gene therapy.  The goal of this research is to find better ways to treat cancer and help cancer patients.
 
Overview

Clinical trials and research studies are important tools in the discovery of new treatments against cancer. Clinical trials contribute important knowledge and may lead to new breakthroughs in the treatment of cancer.  If a new treatment proves effective in a study, it may become a new standard treatment that can help many patients. Most of today's most effective standard treatments are based on previous study results, such as those for breast, colon, rectal, and childhood cancers.

Patients who participate may be helped personally by the treatment(s) they receive. Trial participants get up-to-date care from cancer experts, and they receive either a new treatment being tested or the best available standard treatment for their cancer. Of course, there is no guarantee that a new treatment being tested or a standard treatment will produce good results. New treatments also may have unknown risks.

But, if a new treatment proves effective, or more effective, than standard treatment, study patients who receive it may be among the first to benefit. Many patients receiving standard treatment benefit from it.  In the past, clinical trials were sometimes seen as a last resort for people who had no other treatment choices. Today, patients with common cancers often choose to receive their first treatment in a clinical trial.

The following Johns Hopkins trials currently being evaluated in order to improve the efficacy of colorectal cancer treatments are open to anyone meeting the eligibiligy criteria.  For additional information please call our clinical trials specialist at (410) 614-3163

 
Ongoing Research
Stage I Colorectal Cancer
 
J0746: Biomarker blood test to detect the recurrence of colorectal cancer
Neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy and local excision for rectal cancer.

Stage II Colorectal Cancer
 
E5202: FOLFOX vs. FOLFOX plus Avastin (bevacizumab) for patients who have undergone resection of stage II CRC
Randomized trial comparing preoperative radiation therapy and capcetabine with preoperative radiation therapy and continuous infusion of 5-FU for patients with operable carcinoma of the rectum
J0746: Biomarker blood test to detect the recurrence of colorectal cancer

Stage III Colorectal Cancer
 
Randomized trial comparing preoperative radiation therapy and capcetabine with preoperative radiation therapy and continuous infusion of 5-FU for patients with operable carcinoma of the rectum
J0746: Biomarker blood test to detect the recurrence of colorectal cancer
N0147: FOLFOX vs. FOLFOX plus Erbitux (Cetuximab) for patients who have undergone resection of Stage III CRC

Stage IV Colorectal Cancer
 
Rapid Medical Donation Program. One way that patients with terminal colorectal cancer can greatly benefit colorectal cancer research is by agreeing to undergo an autopsy.
J04104: Sorafenib in combination with Irinotecan and Erbitux (Cetuximab) for patients who have had disease progression after 2 lines of chemotherapy
J0745: Vaccine plus Cytotaxan for patients who have had previously resected colorectal liver metastasis and chemotherapy
J0660: Therasphere for the Treatment of Liver Metastases from Primary Colorectal Cancer
J09110: ARRY, an oral MEK inhibitor for patients who have progressed through standard chemotherapy

Hereditary Colon Cancer
 
Curcumin for Treatment of Intestinal Adenomas in Familial Adenomatous Polyposis (FAP)